Fight Corporate Crime and Boycott the 2012 Olympics

A new idea is doing the rounds about how to fight corporate crime, the banksters and their political lackies. It says hit them hard and loud where it hurts: boycott the London 2012 Olympics.

Now a report from India (February 1, 2012) shows at least one group of athletes share that view. Those of you old enough to remember will recall the monumental pain inflicted on the old Soviet Union by the boycott of the Moscow Olympics in 1980. The 99 percent of us aggrieved by the conduct of the self-serving Establishment may now want to ponder such a boycott as an opportune template for action.

I'm certainly not advocating the forced withdrawal by athletes – that's unlikely to occur anyway.  Governments of the richer nations aren't going to give up their slice of the action so easily. Indeed, most folks would probably agree that the athletes deserve their chance of hard-earned sporting glory and shouldn't become 'collateral damage' caught in the crossfire.

No, what's being suggested here is a strictly financial embargo as consumers – don't patronize the brands, don't buy the merchandise, don't watch the TV broadcasts. If you attend the games make your voice heard and protest, shout loud, raise banners and make the corporatists cringe.

The 2012 Games has 55 sponsors, including Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, Visa, BP, BA and other big hitters. They've thrown in just shy of £700 million, and they are a key source of funding for the £9.3bn cost of putting on the Games. They expect a lot back for their investment. A consumer boycott of the games would hit hardest those multi-nationals investing many millions in advertising and would also cause pain in the heart of the world's financial capital: the City of London.

PR Gurus Say London Olympics is the  Prime Time TV Promo

‘Sponsorship now is about how you get your brand ethos, how you connect with the fan worship and how you’re smart and how you own the story that surrounds the sport,’  says PR guru Mark Borkowski. The 'story' from the London Games should be that taxpayers are saying 'no' to paying for trillion-dollar bank bailouts. We say 'no' to corporate largesse and we say no bank is 'too big' to fail. Let them all fail. End the theft from taxpayers and the asset stripping of debtor nations, otherwise we will retaliate.

Let's not be the slaves to the global elite lording it in London. Let's not allow them to use the occasion to exploit us further during what is fast becoming the worst global economic recession – bigger that the Great Depression of the '30's (far more painful and devastating once the Euro fiat currency collapses).

Why Boycotting the Olympics Makes Sense

History tells us that great international causes need great rallying points in place and time. The whole world was stunned by the 1968 Olympics Black Power salutes given by the African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City. The event was one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.

Time magazine followed up by showing the five-ring Olympic logo with the words, "Angrier, Nastier, Uglier", instead of "Faster, Higher, Stronger."

And the free world rejoiced at the political triumph achieved at an even earlier Olympics in 1936. It has long been regarded as the greatest sporting snub in history – when Adolf Hitler stormed out of the Olympic Stadium in Berlin because Germany had been humiliated by a black man: American sprinter, Jesse Owens, winning four gold medals.

No to Bank Bailouts, False Flag Attacks and Mainstream Media Cronism

This year the 'ninety-nine percent,' sick of the spoon fed propaganda spouted by the mainstream, will have few better opportunities to seize a platform for a peaceful demonstration than London and hurt those 55 leading corporate brands.

‘For those sort of brands it’s a case of keeping you up there,’ says Borkowski. ‘How would it look now if McDonald’s weren’t part of some of those big events?' Yes, Mark and how will it look for them and their corporate bedfellows when we show them up for the globalist exploiters their truly are?

Apathy, willful ignorance and abdication of responsibility are our enemies. Don't sit back while the ' Global Elite' and their lackies in the mainstream media distract us with faux news of false flag attacks, dumbed down entertainment and showbiz trivia. Let's use the Internet (while 'they' still allow us) to educate ourselves, coordinate our efforts and make a difference.

Take your cue from history and see that it happens in London.

2 Comments

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2 responses to “Fight Corporate Crime and Boycott the 2012 Olympics

  1. Anonymous

    Hitler’s snub
    Adolf Hitler did not shun Jesse Owens; he left the venue on the first day of events (perhaps for other reasons, perhaps not) before Cornelius Johnson received the first gold medal for the US. The Olympic organisers told Hitler that he had to award all medals or none, so Hitler stayed away thereafter.
    Owens, by the way claimed that he was shunned—but only by FDR. It was not until Eisenhower was president that Owens was honoured by the US president.
    “Hitler didn’t snub me—it was our president who snubbed me. The president didn’t even send me a telegram.”
    —Jesse Owens, in Triumph: the Untold Story of Jesse Owens and Hitler’s Olympics by Jeremy Schaap (New York, 2007), p. 211.

  2. Anonymous

    Hitler’s snub

    Adolf Hitler did not shun Jesse Owens; he left the venue on the first day of events (perhaps for other reasons, perhaps not) before Cornelius Johnson received the first gold medal for the US. The Olympic organisers told Hitler that he had to award all medals or none, so Hitler stayed away thereafter.
    Owens, by the way claimed that he was shunned—but only by FDR. It was not until Eisenhower was president that Owens was honoured by the US president.

    “Hitler didn’t snub me—it was our president who snubbed me. The president didn’t even send me a telegram.”
    —Jesse Owens, in Triumph: the Untold Story of Jesse Owens and Hitler’s Olympics by Jeremy Schaap (New York, 2007), p. 211.

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